About Michael Brannigan

As I put my head down last night after a few hours of studying (and by studying, I mean doing a little bit of homework and then having theological discussions with my best friend, which later turned to a round of Star Wars: Battlefront), I remembered I had to register for our lovely little blog. As I thought, I came up with a brilliant bit to post; it was clever, funny, wise, witty, the works. Of course, as soon as I finish it, I pass out and forget it all. Basically, so goes the story of my life. Anywho, here I am. I like to think I'm all the things my original post was going to be (yes, that sums up as a tad narcissistic, but hey, aren't we all?), as well as obviously forgetful. But I'm here to do work, change the world; you know the drill. Let's see how this goes, shall we?

Das Blurb (I’m Stealing Joe’s Word)

My major: Political Science.

My concentration: International Relations.

The connection: Since the United States’ debut on the world stage as, arguably, the biggest superpower in the world, we’ve exported foodstuffs to other nations in amounts nearly unimaginable. Most notably, despite the tensions between governments during the Cold War, the United States exported a sizable portion of its grain to the Soviet Union, with which it fed millions of people who starved as a result of the poorly managed state economy. In more recent history, the US tends to supply a majority of United Nations aid packages. Yet, despite it all, millions of individuals still experience and suffer from food insecurity.

Thus, my continuing studies of how states and their governments interact could easily include the ways they trade, specifically in foodstuffs. Why is the US the biggest exporter? Why do we not export to certain states? Why do certain states reject aid or abuse that which they’re given? These are the main topics I think about when confronted with food security. Some think about the engineering aspects, some about the nutritional or agricultural, some about the societal; I think about the politics of food. It’s a topic that suits my appetite (bad pun absolutely intended).

Student Sustainability Summit

Hello again, everybody,

Looks like I’m being a bit of a spammer tonight. Deal with it! And I mean that with love.

So, per Sean’s email and our discussions during our last meeting, it seems to be a generally supported idea that we ought to make an appearance at the Student Sustainability Summit (I’ll call it the SSS for the sake of typing). I figured that I’d start the discussion despite my following issue:

I’d be willing to spearhead our endeavor for that event, except for the fact that I have other classes most of the day, from 10:30 to well after six. Based on the link I’ll post that has their schedule, that’s going to be a bit of a conflict on my end (and considering it’s from 2:00 – 5:30, probably for most people in general).

So, my question is this: how will we figure it out? Professors Winkler and McMullen and Allen, what do you suggest? Or anyone for that matter? I’m honestly at a bit of a loss.

Much obliged,

MB

http://studentsustainabilitysummit.eventbrite.com/

Our (delayed) ideas!

Good evening boys and girls,

My sincerest apologies for the delay in making this post; this past week and weekend really got to me and threw me through a few more hoops than I would have enjoyed.

Anywho, here’s a little rundown of what those of us in the group organizing the symposium discussed:

Goals:

Promote and introduce as basic understanding of national and global food security.

Explain the relevance of our NSG project to the bigger picture of food security.

Through speakers and presentations, instill a positive outlook and provide motivation to those attending to help take on the various aspects and issues surrounding food security in that, despite the reservations that even we may have, it isn’t too huge a problem to tackle.

All of this would take place to the general theme of National Security (from the NSG idea).

Ideas for Speakers, Presentations:

We could ask Dan Newkirk and/or his partners to give a solar energy presentation similar to the one he gave us, with the emphasis on how we applied it to the NSG.

If there are any professors in the College of Ag (or anywhere, for that matter) who happen to be experts on soybeans and their benefits to humanity in general, it’d be great to have them along for the ride.

Anything regarding food security and/or national security, perhaps including some of the speakers who gave presentations during the seminar last semester.

Networking Opportunities:

Student Sustainability Summit: like Sean said, if we could make an appearance there, we’d get Tim Sands’ attention, as well as other groups like PSG who could be incredibly useful to help advertise our events and project.

Facebook and Twitter: awesome posts, ladies! If anyone is a part of a student organization that uses social media, maybe if we could encourage them to follow us on those two mediums and help promote us that way? It’d help especially during the time drawing up to the symposium and opening of the gallery.

I’ll post a bit more on the Student Sustainability Summit in a few minutes.

Any other ideas, we’d love to hear from you!

Best,

MB and the Symposium Group

Michael John Brannigan, the One and Only

Bill Book Photo Michael Brannigan

As I put my head down last night after a few hours of studying (and by studying, I mean doing a little bit of homework and then having theological discussions with my best friend, which later turned to a round of Star Wars: Battlefront), I remembered I had to register for our lovely little blog. As I thought, I came up with a brilliant bit to post; it was clever, funny, wise, witty, the works. Of course, as soon as I finish it, I pass out and forget it all.

Basically, so goes the story of my life.

Here at Purdue University, I’m studying Political Science (International Relations) and History (Cold War era), along with seeking a minor in Naval Science. I work at the Shreve Hall front office, so if anyone’s in the area, come say hi! I’ll hopefully be writing and editing for the Purdue Review, the campus conservative-libertarian student publication.

Anywho, here I am. I like to think I’m all the things my original post was going to be (yes, that sums up as a tad narcissistic, but hey, aren’t we all?), as well as obviously forgetful. But I’m here to do work, change the world; you know the drill. Let’s see how this goes, shall we?