3rd Art and Science Intl. Exhibition, Bejing

November 4th, 2012

Shannon McMullen | Fabian Winkler

Waves Records
3rd Art and Science International Exhibition
China Science & Technology Museum, Beijing
Nov. 1-30, 2012

Installation view in the China Science & Technology Museum.

Installation view in the China Science & Technology Museum.

China Science & Technology Museum, Beijing

 

More information on the 3rd Art and Science International Exhibition at: http://www.tasie.org.cn

Shipment for Bejing exhibition

August 28th, 2012

Here is information on the shipment for the exhibition of “Waves Records” at the 3rd Art and Science International Exhibition in the China Science and Technology Museum. The exhibition runs from November 1 – 30, 2012. More information at: http://www.tasie.org.cn

The mixer and turntable are in one crate and the second crate holds two intaglio prints as well as 2 copies of the exhibition DVD and the custom vinyl records with the water wave sensor data. The packaging order for the prints is as follows (from the bottom up):

  • one sheet of cardboard
  • one sheet of vellum paper
  • print 1
  • one sheet of vellum paper
  • print 2
  • one sheet of vellum paper
  • one sheet of cardboard
  • one layer of foam
  • one sheet of cardboard with records and DVDs inserted
  • one layer of foam on top

Download the instruction for the exhibition setup: setting_up_instructions.pdf

Prints for Bejing exhibition

August 28th, 2012

These intaglio prints were hand-made with the help of Andres Arizaga, graduate student in Studio Arts at Purdue University. The printing plates are laser cut acrylic from pdf files generated in Processing and Adobe Illustrator. The size of the prints is 32×32 inches, they are printed on 100% cotton, acid-free Rives BFK paper. The wave data on the prints was sampled on lake Michigan near Muskegon, MI between June 23, 2010 and August 15, 2010 in a depth of 35m (courtesy of Prof. Cary Troy, Purdue University).

Here are the original .pdf files, the source for the intaglio prints (clicking on each image opens the actual .pdf document):

Finally, we also made individual .pdf files for side A and side B of the record, outputting the sound wave as vector file directly from Processing. However, the lines on the laser cut printing plate turned out to be too fine for the intaglio printing process…

side_A_32x32in.pdf

side_B_32x32in.pdf

EX3 Exhibition Video

June 15th, 2011

Click on the picture above to watch the video

Waves at EX3 – Centro Per L’arte Contemporanea, Firenze, Italy

May 20th, 2011

Installation setup on May 17/18, 2011:

Shannon fine-tuning the mixer:

Closeup of the vinyl record:

Installation shortly before the opening on May 19, 2011 (with C-print – 80x80cm, mixer and record player and documentation DVD on the monitor on the right):

The exhibition of Waves Records is part of the International Symposium on Soundscapes organized by FKL and Tempo Reale and runs from May 19 – 22, 2011.

Print for Florence exhibition

May 5th, 2011

Title: Waves (pt. 1 & pt. 2)

Data sampled on lake Michigan near Muskegon, MI between June 23, 2010 and August 15, 2010 in a depth of 35m. Courtesy Prof. Cary Troy, Purdue University.

One data sample every 10s. The data is played back at a rate of 500Hz on the 45rpm vinyl Maxi.

Data for Florence, Italy exhibition

April 30th, 2011

These are the labels of the records pressed for the upcoming exhibiton at the Florence Museum of Contemporary Art – EX3 as part of the International Symposium of Soundscapes 2011 (May 19-22):

This record is an edition of three 45rpm maxi pre-release of the Waves LP which will also include data gathered in the summer of 2011 on Lake Michigan.

Here is the data download:

label_A.pdf (.pdf, 452KB)

label_B.pdf (.pdf, 452KB)

side_A.wav (wave file 39.5MB)

side_B.wav (wave file, 39.1MB)

Please Note that Waves is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Creative Commons License

Waves Suite Video

April 26th, 2011

Click on the picture above to watch the video

working with .out files and matrices in MatLab

March 4th, 2011

Cary’s last file was in the .out file format, raw data put together in “blocks” rows and columns, like this:

Read in the .out file (I converted a portion of it to a .txt file in TextWrangler):

y = textread('\\Client\C$\Desktop\test_data_out.txt')

this file has an unwanted 9th column (it is invisible in the file but results in a column filled with 0′s in MatLab), so get rid of this column:

y(:,9)=[]

Turn this matrix into an array (transform a matrix into a single vector):

c = y(:)

and calculate the median:

d = median(c)

to get better values between -1.0 and 1.0 for the .wav file I did a simple subtraction and multiplication

c = c-d
c = c * 30

and output the data as a wave file:

wavwrite(c,250,'\\Client\C$\Desktop\test250Hz.wav')

draw graphs, plot data – type:

plottools

Surface Waves, Lake Michigan (NOAA), Oct. 15/16 1998

March 4th, 2011

These are test snippets from data recorded back in 1998 near Michigan City, MI that Cary Troy was able to get for us from NOAA. Cary writes: “It is from a pressure sensor at the bottom of the water.  If you want to deal only with the wave portion of the signal, then subtract the mean of the measurements from the block of data you’re looking at, and then your signal will just be the oscillations of the water surface.”

Here is the original data: w29899.out (.out file format, 88.9MB)

The data is in “blocks” of data – read left to right, and then down for a given block. E block is a bunch of samples (2 samples per second), and a new block is acquired every hour.  This is about as close to a continuous time series as you are likely to get – in order to resolve surface waves, you need to sample at least a few times every second, so you get quickly overloaded with data.

And these are sound snippets of the first 12 hours of this data (1998/10/15 18:00:03 to 1998/10/16 06:00:03) using Cary’s method of getting at the oscillations of the water surface:

firstHour2Hz.wav
(this is a sample rate of the original rate of 2Hz at which the data was recorded)

firstHour250Hz.wav
(out of the three this sounds most interesting, but we could try an even lower frequency)

firstHour500Hz.wav

These are some images of the sound waveform in Audacity:

zoomed in:

(click on images to see higher resolution versions)

For the surface waves portion of the record we might have to sample data at a higher rate than 2Hz (probably 100Hz or even higher). We also only need 15 minutes max. and it would be good to have a 1:1 relationship between the sample rate of the recording and the sample rate of the playback.